Tudor History with Claire Ridgway
September 27 - John de la Pole and his link to the Tudors

September 27 - John de la Pole and his link to the Tudors

September 27, 2020

On this day in history, 27th September 1442, in the reign of King Henry VI, John de la Pole, 2nd Duke of Suffolk, was born. 

He may have been born in the Plantagenet period, but Suffolk's first wife was Lady Margaret Beaufort, the future mother of Henry VII. Suffolk went on to serve Henry VII loyally, although his son was involved in the Lambert Simnel Rebellion

Find out more about John de la Pole, 2nd Duke of Suffolk, his life and career, and what happened with his marriage to Lady Margaret Beaufort, in today's talk from Claire Ridgway.

 
You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/2ZgInW4-65c
 

Also on this day in Tudor history, 27th September 1501, Catherine of Aragon, daughter of Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile, set sail for England from Laredo, Spain. 

Catherine was leaving her homeland to marry Arthur Tudor, son and heir of King Henry VII, a marriage arranged by her parents and the English king in the Treaty of Medina del Campo.
This was Catherine's second attempt at sailing to England, but this time she was successful. Find out more in last year's video - https://youtu.be/xozODpaaNSo 

September 26 - The man Elizabeth I wanted to murder Mary, Queen of Scots

September 26 - The man Elizabeth I wanted to murder Mary, Queen of Scots

September 26, 2020

On this day in Tudor history, 26th September 1588, Sir Amias (Amyas) Paulet, administrator, diplomat, Governor of Jersey and gaoler of Mary, Queen of Scots died. He was buried in St Martin-in-the-Fields, Westminster. 

Sir Amias Paulet acted as gaoler to Mary, Queen of Scots, and it was while he was doing this that Elizabeth wanted him to abide by the Bond of Association and assassinate Mary, Queen of Scots, so that she didn't have to sign her death warrant.

What was the Bond of Association and what did Paulet do?

Find out in today's talk from Claire Ridgway, founder of the Tudor Society.

Book recommendation: My Heart is My Own by John Guy

Also on this day in Tudor history, 26th September 1580, Sir Francis Drake returned from his 3-year circumnavigation of the Globe. Drake landed at the port of Plymouth, in his ship, The Golden Hind, which was laden with treasure and spices. Find out more about his voyage, what he brought back and how Elizabeth I rewarded him, in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/j8aQfsG7Zik

September 25 - Explorer Stephen Borough

September 25 - Explorer Stephen Borough

September 25, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 25th September 1525, explorer, navigator and naval administrator Stephen Borough (Burrough) was born at Borough House, Northam Burrows, Northam, in Devon. 
 
This Arctic explorer learnt his navigational skills from first his uncle and then Spanish pilots in Seville. He discovered Novaya Zemlya and the Viagatz Strait (Kara Strait), which was named the Burrough Strait until the late 1800s.
 
Hear an overview of Stephen Borough's life and career in today's talk from historian Claire Ridgway. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/U0FlpynTWPU
 

Also on this day in Tudor history, 25th September 1534, Pope Clement VII (Giulio di Giuliano de' Medici) died in Rome. It was rumoured that he died from eating death cap mushrooms or from fumes from poisoned candles placed in his room. Find out more about the pope and the rumours surrounding his death, plus what eating a death cap mushroom does to you, in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/QLjh4V1-mjI

September 24 - The executions of a Roman priest and the man who sheltered him

September 24 - The executions of a Roman priest and the man who sheltered him

September 24, 2020

On this day in Tudor history, 24th September 1589, Roman Catholic priest, William Spenser, and layman Robert Hardesty were executed at York. Spenser was executed for being a priest, and Hardesty for sheltering Spenser.

The two men were beatified in 1987 as two of the Eight-five Martyrs of England and Wales.

Find out more about William Spenser and Robert Hardesty, and how they came to their awful ends, in today's talk from Claire Ridgway, author of "On This Day in Tudor History". You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:

https://youtu.be/VlJU6JqLHDs

Also on this day in Tudor history, 24th September 1486, Arthur Tudor, Prince of Wales and son of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York, was christened at a lavish ceremony at Winchester Cathedral. His mother's confinement, his birth, his christening and early upbringing had all been carefully 'choreographed' by his paternal grandmother, Lady Margaret Beaufort, and I shared details in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/PF5kvS4mKuY

September 23 - William Averel and his Romeo and Juliet, AKA Charles and Julia

September 23 - William Averel and his Romeo and Juliet, AKA Charles and Julia

September 23, 2020

On this day in history, 23rd September 1605, in the reign of King James I, Tudor pamphleteer William Averell was buried at St Peter upon Cornhill. 

Averell's first work was about two Welsh star-crossed lovers, Charles and Julia, and he also wrote a Protestant work about it raining wheat in Suffolk and Essex, an event which he saw as presaging the end of the world.

Averell was an interesting character and you can find out more about him and his work in today's talk from Claire Ridgway, founder of the Tudor Society. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:

https://youtu.be/PMZJ2H0IgsA

Also on this day in Tudor history, 23rd September 1571, 49-year-old John Jewel, Bishop of Salisbury, died after being taken ill while preaching a sermon. Not many people have heard of John Jewel, but he had an interesting life which spanned the reigns of King Henry VIII, Edward VI, Lady Jane Grey, Mary I and Elizabeth I – a time of religious change. He was a clergyman, a Protestant exile, a theologian and bishop, and someone who spoke up for what he believed. You can find out more about him in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/P5CBC_FLhP4

Averell's works:

An excellent historie bothe pithy and pleasant, discoursing on the life and death of Charles and Iulia - https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo/A23370.0001.001?view=toc
A meruailous combat of contrarieties - https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo/A23383.0001.001?view=toc 

September 22 - The burial of Amy Dudley (Robsart)

September 22 - The burial of Amy Dudley (Robsart)

September 22, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 22nd September 1560, Amy Dudley (née Robsart), wife of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, was buried in the chancel of the University Church of St Mary the Virgin, Oxford.
 
Amy had been found dead at the foot of the stairs of her home and the subsequent inquest had ruled her death as caused by "misfortune". She was buried in a lavish ceremony which cost her widower over £2,000.
 
Find out more about her burial, and who attended, in today's talk from historian Claire Ridgway. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/vfvbXAM2XuY
 
Book recommendation: “Amy Robsart: A Life and Its End” by Christine Hartweg
 
Find out more about Amy's death and the theories regarding it in my video on her death - https://youtu.be/Dmsqlfm09ZM
 

This day in Tudor history, 22nd September 1515, is the traditional birthdate of Anne of Cleves, a woman who would become King Henry VIII's fourth wife and queen consort, but only for six months! She may have only been queen for a short time, but Anne of Cleves outlived Henry and all of his wives, and seems to have had a very good life. Find out more about her and how she came to be Henry VIII's queen in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/zvuUNFA8U3Q

September 21 - Pendleton the Proud, a fickle man

September 21 - Pendleton the Proud, a fickle man

September 21, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 21st September 1557, Henry Pendleton, theologian, chaplain and friend of Bishop Bonner, was buried at St Stephen's, Walbrook, London. 
 
Pendleton is known not only for his strong preaching, which led to him being shot at once, but also for his changing religious faith. He went from staunch Catholic to zealous Protestant to staunch Catholic, even taking part in disputations with his former friends and seeing them imprisoned and burnt.
 
Find out more about Henry Pendleton, his life, career and changing religious beliefs, in today's talk from historian Claire Ridgway. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/5unuKHk6G4I
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, Sunday 21st September 1578, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, married Lettice Dereveux (née Knollys) in a secret marriage at his house. So secret was it that he only told his chaplain and his friends the day before.
Leicester was marrying the woman Elizabeth I had dubbed "the she-wolf", so he knew that his queen would not be happy. Find out more about the secret wedding and Leicester’s bride, in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/PkC3Y-pbuYA 
September 20 - Anthony Babington and the Babington Plot

September 20 - Anthony Babington and the Babington Plot

September 20, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 20th September 1586, Anthony Babington, John Ballard, John Savage, Chidiock Tichborne and three other conspirators were executed near St Giles-in-the-Fields in London. 
They suffered full traitors' deaths, being hanged, drawn and quartered, after being found guilty of treason for plotting to assassinate Queen Elizabeth I in the famous Babington Plot, which sought to replace Elizabeth with Mary, Queen of Scots.
 
Find out more about Anthony Babington, the Babington Plot, the men involved, how it was discovered, and how it led to Mary, Queen of Scots' execution, in today's talk from Claire Ridgway, author of "On This Day in Tudor History". You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/XJIrGAWx7ao
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 20th September 1486, Arthur Tudor, Prince of Wales, the first son of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York, was born at Winchester. There were high hopes for this boy named after the legendary King Arthur, and King Henry VII believed that son would be a powerful king who would bring a golden age to the country. Of course, things wouldn't go according to plan.
Find out more about Arthur Tudor, who was, of course, Catherine of Aragon's first husband, in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/qYZLYzGU5NE 
September 19 - Explorer Thomas Cavendish and his circumnavigation

September 19 - Explorer Thomas Cavendish and his circumnavigation

September 19, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 19th September 1560, explorer, navigator and privateer Thomas Cavendish was baptised at St Martin's Church, Trimley St Martin in Suffolk. 
Cavendish is known for his imitation of Sir Francis Drake's circumnavigation of the globe, which he undertook in 1586, and for being the first Englishman to explore the island of St Helena, in the mid-Atlantic, but he also had a reputation as a spendthrift and his final voyage was a failure.
 
Find out more about Thomas Cavendish in today's talk from Claire Ridgway, author of several Tudor history books.
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 19th September 1555, in the reign of the Catholic Queen Mary I, Protestants Robert Glover and Cornelius Bungey, were burned at the stake for heresy in Coventry. They were two of twelve martyrs burned in the city between 1511 and 1555. Find out more about them and Glover's experience as he was taken to the site of execution in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/zgwbWZpMqUM 
September 18 - Edward Courtenay, a prospective king consort

September 18 - Edward Courtenay, a prospective king consort

September 18, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 18th September 1556, Edward Courtenay, 1st Earl of Devon, died from a fever at Padua in Italy. 
Courtenay had been sent overseas after he was implicated in Wyatt's Rebellion as a future husband and consort of Queen Mary I's half-sister, Elizabeth, the future Queen Elizabeth I.

In today's talk, historian Claire Ridgway tells us more about this Earl of Devon and how he was a prospective bridegroom for both of Henry VIII's daughters. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/7m95NDwTb_k
 
Also on this day in history, 18th September 1544, Henry VIII rode triumphantly through the streets of Boulogne. The French had surrendered Boulogne on 13th September 1544, following a siege, and King Henry VIII entered it and was given its keys by his good friend, Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, on 18th September. England was victorious but his ally, the Holy Roman Emperor, wasn't behaving himself. Find out more in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/lkaKQH7Gb8o 

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