Tudor History with Claire Ridgway
July 9 - Mary wants to avoid bloodshed and vengeance

July 9 - Mary wants to avoid bloodshed and vengeance

July 9, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 9th July 1553, three days after the death of her half-brother, King Edward VI, and the day after she'd proclaimed herself queen at her estate at Kenninghall, Mary (future Mary I), daughter of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon, wrote to the late king's privy council regarding "some evil" that she'd heard.
 
But what was going on? What had Mary heard and what was she going to do about it?
 
Find out more about the situation and Mary's letter in today's talk from Claire Ridgway, founder of the Tudor Society. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/VEGUbLa45AM
 
Also on this day in history, 9th July 1540, Anne of Cleves went from being Henry VIII’s queen consort to being his “right dear and right entirely beloved sister” after their marriage was annulled. Why was their marriage annulled? How did Anne of Cleves react to the news? What happened to her and Henry VIII afterwards? Find out in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/DUblFQhi58M 
July 8 - Thomas Boleyn’s important duty

July 8 - Thomas Boleyn’s important duty

July 8, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, on 8th July 1503, during the reign of King Henry VII, Thomas Boleyn, father of Anne Boleyn, left Collyweston in Northamptonshire to undertake an important job for the king.
 
He was to be part of a retinue escorting King Henry VII's eldest daughter, Margaret Tudor, to Scotland, for her marriage to King James IV.
 
Find out more about the retinue and journey in today's talk from Claire Ridgway, founder of the Tudor Society. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/eK4F_if9Nm0
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 8th July 1553, two days after her half-brother King Edward VI's death and one day after hearing news of his death, Mary, daughter of King Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon, declared that she was Edward VI's heir and so was queen - Queen Mary I. Find out more in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/M4uasqpXbHs 
John Leland's full account can be read in Joannis Lelandi antiquarii De rebus Britannicis collectanea - https://archive.org/stream/joannislelandia01heargoog#page/n324/mode/2up, p. 265 onwards.
July 7 - William Turner, Father of English botany

July 7 - William Turner, Father of English botany

July 7, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 7th July 1568, naturalist, herbalist, ornithologist, reformer and physician, William Turner, died. Turner is known as “the father of English botany and of ornithology”, but why and who exactly was he? 
 
In today's talk, historian Claire Ridgway gives an overview of Turner's life and career, including his attacks on Bishop Gardiner and his time in exile, plus a bit of trivia about the training of his little dog. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/0sl9iHg7qEY
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 7th July 1556, in the reign of Queen Mary I, Henry Peckham and John Danyell were hanged, drawn and quartered after being found guilty of treason for their involvement in the Dudley Conspiracy. But what was the Dudley Conspiracy? And who was involved in it? What happened? Find out in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/Q9M_UKKxUws 
 
Turner’s “A new herball, wherin are conteyned the names of herbes….” - https://archive.org/details/b30342053_0002
 
You can find Claire at:
https://www.instagram.com/anneboleynfiles/
July 6 - The execution of Sir Thomas More

July 6 - The execution of Sir Thomas More

July 6, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, Tuesday 6th July 1535, Henry VIII’s former friend and Lord Chancellor, Sir Thomas More, was beheaded on Tower Hill as a traitor. 
 
In today's talk, historian Claire Ridgway shares accounts of his execution, including one that gives real insight into More's personality, with his black humour on the scaffold.
 
Claire also gives details on the fate of Sir Thomas More's head and what his daughter, Margaret Roper, did with it. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/e8sf5B6Q5mI
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 6th July 1553, fifteen-year-old King Edward VI died at Greenwich Palace leaving the throne to his cousin's eldest daughter, Lady Jane Grey. Find out more about Edward's final illness and last days, his “Devise for the Succession”, and Lady Jane Grey's reaction at being told that she was Edward’s successor, in my video from last year - https://youtu.be/4UIMLCjf3e0 
July 5 - Sir Thomas More’s last letter

July 5 - Sir Thomas More’s last letter

July 5, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 5th July 1535, Henry VIII’s former Lord Chancellor and good friend, Sir Thomas More, wrote his final letter.
 
More's last letter was addressed to his beloved daughter Margaret (Meg) Roper and it was written in coal. It is a touching letter and includes instructions and messages for other members of the family.
 
In today's talk, historian Claire Ridgway shares Sir Thomas More's letter and gives details on the people mentioned, along with explaining the meaning of the algorism stone.
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 5th July 1589, three Essex women were hanged at Chelmsford, Essex, after being found guilty of murder by witchcraft. Find out how these women came to be accused of witchcraft and why they were hanged in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/hpmkvJyc6x8 
July 4 - Gregory Cromwell - who was he?

July 4 - Gregory Cromwell - who was he?

July 4, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 4th July 1551, Gregory Cromwell, 1st Baron Cromwell, died of sweating sickness at Launde Abbey in Leicestershire. He was laid to rest at the abbey’s chapel on 7th July.

Gregory Cromwell was the son of the more famous Thomas Cromwell, but what do we know about him and what happened to him after his father's fall in 1540? 
 
Find out about the life and career of Gregory Cromwell in today's talk from historian Claire Ridgway. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/7GYY2mLml9o
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 4th July 1533, two men were burnt at the stake at Smithfield for heresy: reformer and theologian John Frith, for his belief that Purgatory didn't exist and his views on the sacrament, and tailor's apprentice Andrew Hewt for his belief regarding the sacrament. Find out more about what was wrong with their beliefs and how they were betrayed in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/IKhab0W7IuQ  
 
July 3 - Pretender Perkin Warbeck lands

July 3 - Pretender Perkin Warbeck lands

July 3, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 3rd July 1495, the pretender Perkin Warbeck landed at Deal in Kent with men and ships. In the ensuing battle, the Battle of Deal, with Kentish men who supported King Henry VII, around 150 of Warbeck’s men were killed and over 160 captured. Warbeck managed to escape, fleeing to Ireland. 
 
Who was Warbeck claiming to be? Whose support did her have? And what happened next?
 
Find out more about claimant Perkin Warbeck in today's talk from Claire Ridgway, founder of the Tudor Society. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/Um4eyVRcDdc
 
You can find out more about Warbeck's background in my video from 23rd November - https://youtu.be/Kdfrn8bj7yA
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, Catherine of Aragon, first wife of King Henry VIII, had a bit of a bad day on this day in Tudor history, 3rd July 1533. Not only had she trodden on a pin and was suffering with a bad cough, but she was also told that she had to stop calling herself queen. Find out how she reacted to the news in last year's video - https://youtu.be/DAOboUEh6uo 
July 2 - Thomas Boleyn’s loss is Cromwell’s gain

July 2 - Thomas Boleyn’s loss is Cromwell’s gain

July 2, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 2nd July 1536, Thomas Cromwell, the king’s right hand man, was formally appointed Lord Privy Seal. The previous holder of the office had been Thomas Boleyn, Earl of Wiltshire and Ormond, who'd been stripped of the office following the falls of his children, Queen Anne Boleyn and George Boleyn, Lord Rochford.
 
But what is a privy seal and what does the Lord of the Privy Seal do?
 
Find out more in today's talk from Claire Ridgway, founder of the Tudor Society. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/_czZ6zZXLr8

Also on this day in Tudor history, 2nd July 1489, Tudor clergyman, statesman, theologian, scholar and highly intelligent man, Thomas Cranmer, Archbishop of Canterbury, was born. You can find out more about him in the video “13 things you probably didn't know about Thomas Cranmer” - https://youtu.be/hsz09DoX9oU

July 1 - Sir Thomas More is found guilty

July 1 - Sir Thomas More is found guilty

July 1, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 1st July 1535, in the reign of King Henry VIII, Sir Thomas More, Henry VIII’s former Lord Chancellor, was tried for high treason by a special commission of oyer and terminer. The commission found him guilty and he was executed on 6th July 1535.
 
But how did More, a faithful and loyal servant of the king, end up in this mess? Who was on the commission and what exactly happened?
 
Find out all about the fall of Sir Thomas More in today's talk from historian Claire Ridgway. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/R0gqJjQCAAM
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 1st July 1543, in the reign of King Henry VIII, the Treaties of Greenwich were signed. These treaties were between the kingdoms of Scotland and England, and, amongst other terms, was the agreement of a marriage between Prince Edward, the future King Edward VI, and Mary, Queen of Scots. Find out more about these treaties and the subsequent war known as the Rough Wooing in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/0Xmp5ar3MkU 
June 30 - A mortal head wound for a jousting King of France

June 30 - A mortal head wound for a jousting King of France

June 30, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 30th June 1559, keen sportsman, King Henry II of France, suffered a mortal head wound while jousting. He died on 10th July and was succeeded by his son, Francis II.
 
Jousting was a dangerous sport and Henry was fatally injured when splinters from his opponent's lance entered his right eye. Awful!
 
Find out more about Henry II's accident and death, and also his reign, in today's talk from Claire Ridgway, author of "On This Day in Tudor History". You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/H7njMclKCYE
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 30th June 1541, King Henry VIII and his fifth wife, Queen Catherine Howard, set off on their progress to the north of England. Find out about the motives behind this huge undertaking, what happened on the progress, and why Henry's life changed so dramatically when he got back in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/YJqgOXlqxYo