Tudor History with Claire Ridgway
November 29 - A courtier who served in four monarchs’ reign and died a natural death!

November 29 - A courtier who served in four monarchs’ reign and died a natural death!

November 29, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 29th November 1528, nobleman and courtier, Anthony Browne, 1st Viscount Montagu, was born.
 
Montagu began his court career with the help of his father in Henry VIII's reign. served as a privy councillor in Mary I's reign, and died a natural death as a wealthy man in Elizabeth I's reign. He even survived being implicated in a rebellion!  

Who was Anthony Browne, 1st Viscount Montagu, and just how did he manage to not only have an excellent court career, but leave a fortune to his grandson, when he was a Catholic in Elizabeth I's reign?
 
Find out all about him in today's talk from Claire Ridgway, author of several Tudor history books.
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 29th November 1530,  Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, Henry VIII’s former Lord Chancellor, died at Leicester Abbey. The cardinal cheated the executioner by dying a natural death while on his way to London to answer charges of treason. You can find out about Cardinal Wolsey's death, and who ended up being buried in the sarcophagus he'd had commissioned in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/KtVsZbo9RWs 
November 28 - A drowned agent carrying gold for Mary, Queen of Scots

November 28 - A drowned agent carrying gold for Mary, Queen of Scots

November 28, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 28th November 1565, member of Parliament and political agent Francis Yaxley set sail for Scotland from Antwerp. 
 
Sadly, Yaxley's ship was wrecked in a storm and he never reached Scotland, and neither did the gold he was carrying to Mary, Queen of Scots.
 
But why was he carrying gold and who was it from? What happened to the gold?
 
Find out all about Yaxley, how he came to be travelling from Antwerp to Scotland, and what happened to him and the gold, in today's talk from historian Claire Ridgway.
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 28th November 1499, Edward Plantagenet, styled Earl of Warwick, was executed by beheading on Tower Hill. Warwick was a potential claimant to the throne being the son of George, Duke of Clarence, brother of Kings Edward IV and Richard III, but it was his involvement in a plot by pretender Perkin Warbeck that was his final undoing.
Find out more about his short and sad life, much of it spent in prison, in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/nqbeu8R3XMw 
November 27 - Former monk burnt at stake for importing books

November 27 - Former monk burnt at stake for importing books

November 27, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 27th November 1531, former Benedictine monk and reformist, Richard Bayfield, was burnt at the stake at Smithfield for heresy after Sir Thomas More had caught him importing heretical books into England.
 
It wasn't Bayfield's first brush with the authorities. He'd been in trouble for heresy previously so was now deemed a "relapsed heretic". This time, penance wasn't enough, he was condemned to death.
 
Find out more about Richard Bayfield, how he went from being a monk to a reformer, and how he ended up at the stake as a Protestant martyr. Claire also shares John Foxe's account of Bayfield's burning. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/K2C1uDitPV0
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 27th November 1582, eighteen-year-old William Shakespeare, the famous playwright and a man known as the Bard, married twenty-six-year-old Anne (also known as Agnes) Hathaway, at Temple Grafton, near Stratford-upon-Avon, in Warwickshire. 
Anne Hathaway was pregnant at the time of their marriage and went on to give birth to a daughter, Susannah, the following May. You can find out more about William Shakespeare and Anne Hathaway, and their marriage, and also what happened to them, in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/d0_g9G8TXGA 
 
November 26 - The first men executed under Elizabeth I’s new law

November 26 - The first men executed under Elizabeth I’s new law

November 26, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 26th November 1585, Catholic priest Hugh Taylor and his friend Marmaduke Bowes were hanged at York. 
They were the first men executed under Elizabeth I's 1585 statute which made it treason to be a Jesuit or seminary priest in England or to harbour such a priest. 
 
These two Catholics were beatified in 1987 by Pope John Paul II as two of the 85 Martyrs of England, Scotland and Wales.

Find out more about these men and what this 1585 legislation was all about in today's talk from historian Claire Ridgway. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/93IK-VoDABY
 
Book recommendation: "God’s Traitors: Terror & Faith in Elizabethan England” by Jessie Childs.
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 26th November 1533, Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond and Somerset, the illegitimate son of King Henry VIII, married Mary Howard, daughter of Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, at Hampton Court Palace. They were both fourteen years old.
It appears that the marriage, which was a political match rather than a love match, was the idea of Henry VIII's second wife, Anne Boleyn. You can find out more about the marriage and its context in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/BiUZPBM3wDA 
November 25 - A vicious man who saved an archbishop

November 25 - A vicious man who saved an archbishop

November 25, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 25th November 1545, lawyer, member of Parliament, diplomat and ecclesiastical administrator, Sir Thomas Legh, died. 
Legh was a faithful servant to King Henry VIII, but his work during the dissolution of the monasteries led to complaints against him and even rebellion.
 
He was a vicious man, known for his harsh treatment of monks, but he also played a key role in protecting Thomas Cranmer, Archbishop of Canterbury, in 1543 when his enemies tried to bring him down.
 
Let me give you a few facts about this Tudor man, Sir Thomas Legh...

Also on this day in Tudor history, 25th November 1487,  Elizabeth of York, queen consort of Henry VII and mother of one-year-old Arthur Tudor, was crowned queen at Westminster Abbey. Find out more about her coronation, including what Elizabeth wore and who attended, plus a list of some of the interesting dishes served at her coronation banquet which included swan and seal, in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/FaW8MH35q90 

November 24 - John Knox, famous Scottish reformer and royal chaplain

November 24 - John Knox, famous Scottish reformer and royal chaplain

November 24, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 24th November 1572, John Knox, the Scottish clergyman, famous Reformer , royal chaplain, and founder of Presbyterianism, died at his home in Edinburgh as his second wife, Margaret, read aloud from Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians. 
 
John Knox is known for bringing the Protestant reformation to the church in Scotland and his controversial views about women rulers, but he was also chaplain to King Edward VI and had a very eventful life, being taken prisoner by the French and being forced into service on the galleys of their fleet at one point.
 
Find out more about John Knox's life and career in today's talk from Claire Ridgway, author of "On This Day in Tudor History". You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/dRJTCsw8V5g
 
The Works of John Knox can be read online at Archive.org - https://archive.org/search.php?query=works%20of%20john%20knox 

July 20 - John Knox's attack on Mary I - https://youtu.be/K5BsnQ3WTwQ

 Also on this day in Tudor history, Saturday 24th November 1487, the coronation procession of Elizabeth of York, queen consort of King Henry VII, the first Tudor monarch, took place in London.

Elizabeth of York's coronation was scheduled for the next day. She had become queen in January 1486, but her coronation had been postponed due to pregnancy and trouble with the Cornish rebels and Perkin Warbeck. Finally, Henry VII's wife and the mother of little Prince Arthur could be crowned queen. Find out all about her coronation procession, what Elizabeth wore, who was involved and what happened, in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/2NH0UdCYyB4 

November 23 - A plot to poison Elizabeth i’s saddle and Essex’s chair

November 23 - A plot to poison Elizabeth i’s saddle and Essex’s chair

November 23, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 23rd November 1598, scrivener and sailor Edward Squire was hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn for treason after being accused of plotting with Jesuits in Seville to poison Elizabeth I's saddle and the Earl of Essex's chair.
 
Squire, who ended up in Seville after being captured by Spaniards while on a voyage with Sir Francis Drake, confessed under torture, but claimed his innocence at his trial and execution.
 
But what exactly happened, and how and why did a Protestant scrivener and sailor end up accused of treason?
 
Find out all about Edward Squire and the alleged plot to assassinate Queen Elizabeth I and her favourite, Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, in today's talk from historian Claire Ridgway. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/eTmUVXqPlUU
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 23rd November 1499, in the reign of King Henry VII, pretender Perkin Warbeck was hanged at Tyburn after allegedly plotting to help another claimant, Edward, Earl of Warwick, escape from the Tower of London. Warbeck had claimed to be Richard of Shrewsbury, Duke of York, the younger of the Princes in the Tower, and had even been proclaimed King Richard IV, but his rebellion and claim failed. Find out all about Warbeck in last year’s video -  https://youtu.be/Kdfrn8bj7yA
November 22 - Explorer Sir Martin Frobisher dies of gangrene

November 22 - Explorer Sir Martin Frobisher dies of gangrene

November 22, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 22nd November 1594, naval commander, privateer and explorer, Sir Martin Frobisher, died at Plymouth. He died of gangrene after having been shot in the thigh during hand-to-hand combat during a siege.
 
Frobisher is best known for his three voyages in search of the Northwest Passage and his naval service during the 1588 Spanish Armada, for which he was knighted.
 
Find out all about the life and career of this Tudor explorer in today's talk from Claire Ridgway, author of several Tudor history books. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/N96bbIVBr2I
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 22nd November 1545, Henry VIII’s trusted physician and confidant, Sir William Butts, died after suffering from malaria.
Sir William Butts was the doctor who was sent to treat Anne Boleyn, when she was ill with sweating sickness, and also advised on Princess Mary's sickness. He was also the man King Henry VIII confided in about his problems consummating his marriage to Anne of Cleves. He was obviously a man the king could trust. You can find out more about him in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/39hVtHLo_l8 
 
Claire is the founder of the Tudor Society, an online membership site for those who love Tudor history. There, you can learn from Claire and many other expert historians and authors, enjoy Tudor-focused magazines and live Q&A sessions with experts, and have access to all kinds of talks, articles, quizzes, virtual tours and more. Try it with a 14-day free trial - https://www.tudorsociety.com/signup/
 
Claire has written some bestselling Tudor history books:
 
On This Day in Tudor History - https://amzn.to/3oceahH
The Fall of Anne Boleyn: A Countdown - https://amzn.to/3m8KaSi
George Boleyn: Tudor Poet, Courtier and Diplomat - https://amzn.to/2TdwyZr
The Anne Boleyn Collection - https://amzn.to/3kiQc1T
The Anne Boleyn Collection II - https://amzn.to/3o9LUwi
The Anne Boleyn Collection III - https://amzn.to/3kiQc1T
The Life of Anne Boleyn Colouring Books - https://amzn.to/3jkJ5Vz
 
Claire has also done an online history course, The Life of Anne Boleyn, for MedievalCourses.com - https://medievalcourses.com/overview/life-anne-boleyn-mc06/
 
You can find Claire at:
https://www.instagram.com/anneboleynfiles/
November 21  - John Bale, a churchman and playwright who courted controversy

November 21 - John Bale, a churchman and playwright who courted controversy

November 21, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 21st November 1495, churchman, Protestant playwright, historian and Bishop of Ossory, John Bale was born in Suffolk. 
 
Bale wrote twenty-four plays, and a book on famous British writers, which is his most well-known work. His work on Protestant martyrs was also used by the famous martyrologist John Foxe.
 
John Bale also courted controversy with his attacks on Catholics, and he spent a fair amount of time in exile.
 
Find out all about this accomplished Tudor man in today's talk from historian Claire Ridgway. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/-4JYIF9m8AA
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 21st November 1559, Frances Grey, Duchess of Suffolk and mother of Queen Jane, or Lady Jane Grey, died at Richmond.
Frances, daughter of Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, and Mary Tudor, Queen of France, has gone down in history as rather a harsh and abusive mother, but I told you all about the woman who was once named in Edward VI's "devise for the succession" in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/aPw924EMt7s I also introduced Teasel the dog who had just joined us! And I think Ari the cat features too! Now you really need to watch that one!
November 20 - Elizabeth I’s godson and his flush toilet

November 20 - Elizabeth I’s godson and his flush toilet

November 20, 2020
On this day in history, 20th November 1612, in the reign of King James I, courtier and author Sir John Harington died. 
Why am I talking about a man who died in the Stuart period?
Well, because he was Queen Elizabeth I’s godson and because during her reign he invented the Ajax, or “jakes”, England’s first flush toilet.
 
Find out more about Sir John Harington and his flush toilet invention in today's talk from Claire Ridgway, author of "On This Day in Tudor History".
 
Also on this day in history, 20th November 1591, Sir Christopher Hatton, Elizabeth I’s Lord Chancellor and favourite, died aged fifty-one. He was such a favourite of Queen Elizabeth I that he had a dazzling career and was constantly at her side. Find out more about Sir Christopher Hatton, his career and accomplishments, his patronage of learned men and explorers, and his special relationship with Elizabeth I, in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/IzhdmD7Lgm8 

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