Tudor History with Claire Ridgway
July 20 - Queen Claude of France

July 20 - Queen Claude of France

July 20, 2020
On this day in history, 20th July 1524, Queen Claude of France, consort of Francis I, died at the age of just twenty-four at the Royal Chateau of Blois. She was temporarily laid to rest there and then later moved to the Cathedral Basilica of Saint Denis just outside Paris.
 
Brantôme declared that Claude’s husband, Francis I, gave her “the pox, which shortened her days”, meaning syphilis, but the cause of her death is not known for certain.
 
In today's talk, Claire Ridgway, founder of the Tudor Society, gives an overview of Queen Claude's life, as well as sharing the theories regarding her death. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/makEt_XfOH8
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 20th July 1554, John Knox, theologian and a leader of the Protestant Reformation in Scotland, published a pamphlet attacking the Catholic Queen Mary I, her religious measures and her persecution of Protestants. Find out what he said in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/K5BsnQ3WTwQ 
July 19 - The sinking of the Mary Rose

July 19 - The sinking of the Mary Rose

July 19, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 19th July 1545, Henry VIII’s flagship, the Mary Rose, sank right in front of his eyes in the Battle of the Solent between the English and French fleets.
 
But why did the Mary Rose sink?
 
In today's talk, historian Claire Ridgway shares the various theories on the sinking of the Mary Rose, as well as talking about the salvage operations over time, her raising in 1983, and the work of the Mary Rose Trust. See https://maryrose.org/ for details on visiting the ship and the museum. 
You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/Bq7oWs73I18
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 19th July 1553, the reign of Queen Jane (Lady Jane Grey) was brought to an end when Mary, the late King Edward VI's half-sister, was officially proclaimed queen in London. Hear contemporary accounts of how the news was celebrated in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/7ItxRRrwkZY 
July 17 - Richard Carew, a multi-talented man

July 17 - Richard Carew, a multi-talented man

July 17, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 17th July 1555, Richard Carew, was born at Antony House, Torpoint, in Cornwall.
 
As well as serving his county and country in several offices, Carew was also an antiquary, bee-keeper, translator and poet. He is known for his book a "Survey of Cornwall", which has been reprinted on several occasions over the centuries. You can read it at https://archive.org/stream/surveycornwalla00caregoog#page/n10/mode/2up
 
Find out all about this multi-talented Tudor man in today's talk from Claire Ridgway, author of several history books. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/Mnzrgm0d1lM
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 17th July 1555, Protestant martyrs Christopher Wade (Waid) of Dartford, linen-weaver, and Margaret, or Margery, Polley, a widow from Pepenbury, Tunbridge, were burned at the stake for heresy. Find out more about them in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/g5JqBKvmI0I 
July 14 - Richard Taverner and his Bible

July 14 - Richard Taverner and his Bible

July 14, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 14th July 1575, evangelical reformer and translator, Richard Taverner, died at Woodeaton in Oxfordshire. He was laid to rest in the parish church at Woodeaton.
 
Richard Taverner is mainly known for his Bible translation, "Taverner's Bible", but there is far more to him than that, including his time as Thomas Cromwell's chief propagandist.
 
Find out all about Richard Taverner's life and career in today's talk from Tudor history author, Claire Ridgway. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/q8nMh_bx5qU
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 14th July 1551, fifteen-year-old Henry Brandon, 2nd Duke of Suffolk, and his fourteen-year-old brother, Charles, 3rd Duke of Suffolk, both sons of Catherine Willoughby, Duchess of Suffolk, and the late Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, died at Buckden. The boys had been taken ill in a sweating sickness epidemic that had hit Cambridge. Find out more in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/oSNvXjyiFDY 
July 7 - William Turner, Father of English botany

July 7 - William Turner, Father of English botany

July 7, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 7th July 1568, naturalist, herbalist, ornithologist, reformer and physician, William Turner, died. Turner is known as “the father of English botany and of ornithology”, but why and who exactly was he? 
 
In today's talk, historian Claire Ridgway gives an overview of Turner's life and career, including his attacks on Bishop Gardiner and his time in exile, plus a bit of trivia about the training of his little dog. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/0sl9iHg7qEY
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 7th July 1556, in the reign of Queen Mary I, Henry Peckham and John Danyell were hanged, drawn and quartered after being found guilty of treason for their involvement in the Dudley Conspiracy. But what was the Dudley Conspiracy? And who was involved in it? What happened? Find out in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/Q9M_UKKxUws 
 
Turner’s “A new herball, wherin are conteyned the names of herbes….” - https://archive.org/details/b30342053_0002
 
You can find Claire at:
https://www.instagram.com/anneboleynfiles/
July 6 - The execution of Sir Thomas More

July 6 - The execution of Sir Thomas More

July 6, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, Tuesday 6th July 1535, Henry VIII’s former friend and Lord Chancellor, Sir Thomas More, was beheaded on Tower Hill as a traitor. 
 
In today's talk, historian Claire Ridgway shares accounts of his execution, including one that gives real insight into More's personality, with his black humour on the scaffold.
 
Claire also gives details on the fate of Sir Thomas More's head and what his daughter, Margaret Roper, did with it. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/e8sf5B6Q5mI
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 6th July 1553, fifteen-year-old King Edward VI died at Greenwich Palace leaving the throne to his cousin's eldest daughter, Lady Jane Grey. Find out more about Edward's final illness and last days, his “Devise for the Succession”, and Lady Jane Grey's reaction at being told that she was Edward’s successor, in my video from last year - https://youtu.be/4UIMLCjf3e0 
July 4 - Gregory Cromwell - who was he?

July 4 - Gregory Cromwell - who was he?

July 4, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 4th July 1551, Gregory Cromwell, 1st Baron Cromwell, died of sweating sickness at Launde Abbey in Leicestershire. He was laid to rest at the abbey’s chapel on 7th July.

Gregory Cromwell was the son of the more famous Thomas Cromwell, but what do we know about him and what happened to him after his father's fall in 1540? 
 
Find out about the life and career of Gregory Cromwell in today's talk from historian Claire Ridgway. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/7GYY2mLml9o
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 4th July 1533, two men were burnt at the stake at Smithfield for heresy: reformer and theologian John Frith, for his belief that Purgatory didn't exist and his views on the sacrament, and tailor's apprentice Andrew Hewt for his belief regarding the sacrament. Find out more about what was wrong with their beliefs and how they were betrayed in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/IKhab0W7IuQ  
 
July 3 - Pretender Perkin Warbeck lands

July 3 - Pretender Perkin Warbeck lands

July 3, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 3rd July 1495, the pretender Perkin Warbeck landed at Deal in Kent with men and ships. In the ensuing battle, the Battle of Deal, with Kentish men who supported King Henry VII, around 150 of Warbeck’s men were killed and over 160 captured. Warbeck managed to escape, fleeing to Ireland. 
 
Who was Warbeck claiming to be? Whose support did her have? And what happened next?
 
Find out more about claimant Perkin Warbeck in today's talk from Claire Ridgway, founder of the Tudor Society. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/Um4eyVRcDdc
 
You can find out more about Warbeck's background in my video from 23rd November - https://youtu.be/Kdfrn8bj7yA
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, Catherine of Aragon, first wife of King Henry VIII, had a bit of a bad day on this day in Tudor history, 3rd July 1533. Not only had she trodden on a pin and was suffering with a bad cough, but she was also told that she had to stop calling herself queen. Find out how she reacted to the news in last year's video - https://youtu.be/DAOboUEh6uo 
July 2 - Thomas Boleyn’s loss is Cromwell’s gain

July 2 - Thomas Boleyn’s loss is Cromwell’s gain

July 2, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 2nd July 1536, Thomas Cromwell, the king’s right hand man, was formally appointed Lord Privy Seal. The previous holder of the office had been Thomas Boleyn, Earl of Wiltshire and Ormond, who'd been stripped of the office following the falls of his children, Queen Anne Boleyn and George Boleyn, Lord Rochford.
 
But what is a privy seal and what does the Lord of the Privy Seal do?
 
Find out more in today's talk from Claire Ridgway, founder of the Tudor Society. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/_czZ6zZXLr8

Also on this day in Tudor history, 2nd July 1489, Tudor clergyman, statesman, theologian, scholar and highly intelligent man, Thomas Cranmer, Archbishop of Canterbury, was born. You can find out more about him in the video “13 things you probably didn't know about Thomas Cranmer” - https://youtu.be/hsz09DoX9oU

July 1 - Sir Thomas More is found guilty

July 1 - Sir Thomas More is found guilty

July 1, 2020
On this day in Tudor history, 1st July 1535, in the reign of King Henry VIII, Sir Thomas More, Henry VIII’s former Lord Chancellor, was tried for high treason by a special commission of oyer and terminer. The commission found him guilty and he was executed on 6th July 1535.
 
But how did More, a faithful and loyal servant of the king, end up in this mess? Who was on the commission and what exactly happened?
 
Find out all about the fall of Sir Thomas More in today's talk from historian Claire Ridgway. You can see this podcast as a video at the following link:
https://youtu.be/R0gqJjQCAAM
 
Also on this day in Tudor history, 1st July 1543, in the reign of King Henry VIII, the Treaties of Greenwich were signed. These treaties were between the kingdoms of Scotland and England, and, amongst other terms, was the agreement of a marriage between Prince Edward, the future King Edward VI, and Mary, Queen of Scots. Find out more about these treaties and the subsequent war known as the Rough Wooing in last year’s video - https://youtu.be/0Xmp5ar3MkU 
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